Changing attitudes toward teen sex dating

22 May

While attitudes toward gay and lesbian identity (among other issues) remain tangled and complex, the crucial thing to bear in mind is that all of us have such questions at one time or another.There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual facts and circumstances.With more emerging adults having casual sex, researchers are exploring psychological consequences of such encounters. Garcia, The Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction, Indiana University, Bloomington; and Chris Reiber, Sean G. Merriwether, Binghamton University, State University of New York February 2013, Vol 44, No.But that leaves the other half at risk — many of them engaging in unprotected sex, exposing themselves to potentially grave disease and unwanted pregnancy.“The most important thing to teach your child is responsibility,” Dr. “Discuss how to make decisions and understand what the consequences of decisions will be. Use this moment as an opportunity to teach and encourage, not to pronounce a harsh, dismissive judgment.You can start by discussing decisions and consequences that don’t involve sex, and then move the conversation toward sexuality. By engaging the child and building his self-esteem and her confi dence in her ability to make judgments, you’re showing him that you respect what he’s learning and how she’s growing in her decision-making.”After all, however adult their appearance, behavior, and attitudes may appear, adolescents remain closer to childhood than adulthood, and children need ongoing parental guidance to prepare for adulthood.

Obviously, changes in your child’s body as puberty begins are crucial markers for such conversations.

One area that should receive particular attention is “urban myths” — bits of false information that “everyone” knows, passed along from adolescent to adolescent (and even from generation to generation: Don’t be surprised to find that your child has heard some of the same myths and misinformation that circulated during your adolescence).

The only foolproof approach to sexual safety, of course, is to say “no” and defer sexual activity until later in life.

The good news is that as many as half of all adolescents do just that.

D., FAAP, Chairman of the Pediatrics Department and Director of Adolescent Medicine at Coney Island Hospital, Brooklyn, N. “The most appropriate and important thing for a parent and a child or adolescent in dealing with questions about sexuality and sexual health is an open channel of communication.”In today’s hyper-sexualized culture of Internet sites, mass media entertainers, and 24/7 programming, the traditional “birds and bees” lecture (or pamphlet handed to the child to read on her or his own) on reproductive basics is completely inadequate.

Carefully preparing children for the normal changes in their bodies as well as the endless assault of peer pressure, media glorification of irresponsible sexuality, and advertising come-ons is the only way to create a sense of security for parents and children alike.