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Founder of the swinging Roomful Of Blues, a rocking Pleasure King and a high-flying Fabulous Thunderbird for a spell.

Whether working in conjunction with pals including Harry Manx (three albums) and The Sisters Euclid (five albums), on his own (seven and more releases), or as a sideman, Breit always brings something engaging and frankly unique to his recorded appearances.

Blues, jazz, roots, and folk, Breit has demonstrated he can turn his hands and ears to every type of music.

The reliable smooth Chicago texture of Southside Stomp a staple feel on any Earl and the Broadcasters album is set against the deep warmth of Jims Song written and performed by Earl for the memory of bandmate and bassist Jim Mouradian. We were in thralled, if that includes drinkin' all day.

Vocalist Diane Blue throws out excellent phrasing and soul on Heartbreak (Its Killing Me) and just kills on Never Gonna Break My Faith surrounded by supple chops from Dave Limina on Hammond B-3 and Earls guitar solos and fills Personally speaking Sugar Ray Norcias song Long Lost Conversation is total blues bliss with Earl and The Bluetones. That song is followed by the gorgeous and soulful Sweet Miss Vee written by Earl. Although at that time I believe it was a three-piece power trio that had energy out the ass.

features a trio of legendary Texas guitarslingers Jimmie Vaughan, Z. Tops Billy F Gibbons and Charlie Sexton as well as a host of other Lone Star State all-stars.

Foley holds the record for the most Maple Blues Awards in Canada and has earned three Trophees de Blues de France.

A cover of Reverend Gary Davis Death Dont Have No Mercy goes deeper than deep in true Davis Piedmont tradition. You Should Have Known, a digital-only single from legendary Canadian western singer-songwriter Ian Tyson, unapologetically celebrates the hard living, hard drinking, hard loving cowboy life. Well, this isn't a trio but it has the same ass-kickin' energy, with the addition of long-time band member Bruce Bears on keys and the amazing Sax Gordon on, what else, sax.

You better believe Earl and the Broadcasters are digging deep on this recording. Written by Nashville's Pat Mc Laughlin and featuring veteran session-man Charlie Mc Coy, the song yodels, slides and two-steps through the country music foothills, peaking with the raw emotions of a lifestyle that's increasingly rare. In my opinion Gordon channels the spirit and Chi-town style of early J. (Big Boy) Brown's guttural bleats and squawks that put a big smile on your face.

Produced by Swedish blues guitar player Staffan Astner, Afternoon in Paris promises the right mix of groovy blues and soulful jazz (with a touch of Swedish folk melody) and shows Yana Bibbs musical range, influence and depth. Whilst wrote Blues fans would be wise not to overlook. On my first listen (and my opinion has never changed on repeated listens), this is the Duke Robillard I experienced in 1984 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, at B. The recording techniques draw from old-school, sparse mike placement and modern recording equipment that will give you an idea how the masters might sound today. Take that and how damn much younger Duke sounds vocally.

So strong that I think Michael John discovered a long lost bottle of water from Juan Ponce De Leon's fountain!!